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Question and Answer

Tom Kyte

Thanks for the question, Jose.

Asked: November 05, 2012 - 11:13 am UTC

Last updated: November 05, 2012 - 11:35 am UTC

Version: 10.2.0.4

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You Asked

Hello Tom:
In the last few years we have seen how the number of information systems has increased, but also the automation of database administration processes.
Now with the new Exadata and SaaS technologies it seems that you could build a system without the need/help of a database administrator.
Do you think that databases will stay in local machines at local datacenters? If not, what will be the future for database administrators?

and we said...

Now with the new Exadata and SaaS technologies it seems that you could build a system without the need/help of a database administrator.

question from me: how does Exadata *not* require a DBA??? It is a fast, big machine, but just a fast big machine. It is not magic, you still need administrators

and regarding SaaS/PaaS/Daas (database as a service) <Whatever>aaS - they need DBA's to manage their systems. The location where you work may change - but the need is still there.

Do you think that databases will stay in local machines at local datacenters?

sure, for the near term at any rate. there will probably always be some amount of "internal systems".

And many people will opt to run their own private cloud (needs DBA's) internally as well.

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still here

Doug, November 06, 2012 - 6:03 pm UTC

When Oracle 7 came out, alot of people started saying DBAs were becoming redundant, I think DBAs are need more than ever. I have seen what happens when a bunch of people with no experience install Oracle and build a production system with no idea. It's not pretty at all!

DBA? The person we don't understand and administrate our obscur databases for us?

Loïc, March 14, 2013 - 3:23 am UTC

Hi Jose, Tom,
a very good question indeed.

I would say... "it depends" :)

If DBA's role is understood and respected this can lead to good future. If not, it may be hard to justify his position and outsourcing may be the future...

From my experience, there are many companies where DBA roles and responsibilities are still unclear.

A way to know that is to ask: what are the differences between production DBA and application DBA? If one starts to say they are interchangeable, then there are chances they don't know, and it may be hard. (Of course there are other types of DBA that I didn't describe like datawarehouse experts, OLTP experts, BI experts...)

Also to note that a DBA team managed by someone who don't understand anything related to databases or imagine it works like this or like that (like a DB on mainframe or as google told...), tends to be not very efficient.

About Exadata, a new role is emerging: DBMA (Database Machine Administrator) and when you look at it, Oracle, SAP, Microsoft (who announced it by the end of 2012) and IBM (who invented mainframes...) are taking the path to Appliance and Engineered Systems (even Gartner speaks about 35% of servers by 2015 will be integrated systems).

If we add all these data produced by all these numerous devices outside, I presume future for people close to data will be challenging and thus great!

Start to look at Big Data use cases, missing data scientists in IT, Business who more and more really need IT to help them (if not to merge with them) to be more competitive, innovative...

I advise you to look for Peter Hinssen books, delightful... as those written by Tom Of course ;)

Hope that helps.

Loïc